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JSeesequasis.com is known for its unique and extraordinary contemporary Native American accessories, gifts, art and design.
 

Water Spirit

Ledger Art Prints 2015-2017

Water Spirit

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Web site  print only pic 2 water spirit.jpg
Web site  print only pic 1 water spirit.jpg
Web site  print only pic 3 water spirit.jpg
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Water Spirit

29.00

***Print Only for Sale***
Water Spirit
Artist Signed Print
11"x17"
Original is mixed media (pen & ink, acrylic, colored pencil)
on antique ledger paper

The water spirit of my nation is female. 

Violence directed toward our land and water is connected to the violence of women. How you demonstrate value to our natural resources is a direct reflection on how you value the lives of women of your nation. 

Like water the women of my nation are strong, over time water is strong enough to cut into stone, we are just as strong and resilient enough help our nation survive outright and continual genocide. Women are and always have been the strength and backbone of my nation. We are honored to be the care takers and protectors of the water spirit. We have used the water spirit to sustain our nations both spiritually and physically since creator put us here. We carry water for ceremony and we use it to heal. As women and life givers it is our connectedness to ALL that we feel driven to protect water and raise awareness that water is essential for all life no matter who you are or where you live.

When water is threatened or endangered as it is in Standing Rock and many other places on our indigenous lands, I was moved to paint my nations water spirit, in hopes that it helps to raise awareness that we are all connected and that we must ALL do our part protect and take care of our water spirits. 

50% of profits donated to Standing Rock Tribe Legal Fund - Treaty Defense

Ledger Art History
This genre, often called Ledger Art, represents a transitional form of Plains Indian artistry corresponding to the forced reduction of Plains tribes to government reservations, roughly between 1860 and 1900. Due to the destruction of the buffalo herds and other game animals of the Great Plains by Anglo-Americans during and after the Civil War, painting on buffalo hide gave way to works on paper, muslin, canvas, and occasionally commercially prepared cow or buffalo hides.

Changes in the content of pictographic art, the rapid adjustment of Plains artists to the relatively small size of a sheet of ledger paper, and the wealth of detail possible with new coloring materials, marks Plains ledger drawings as a new form of Native American art. As such, ledger painting portrays a transitional expression of art and material culture that links traditional (pre-reservation) Plains painting to the Plains and Pueblo Indian painting styles that emerged during the 1920s in Indian schools in Oklahoma and New Mexico.

Beginning in the early 1860s, Plains Indian men adapted their representational style of painting to paper in the form of accountants ledger books. Traditional paints and bone and stick brushes used to paint on hide gave way to new implements such as colored pencils, crayon, and occasionally water color paints. Plains artists acquired paper and new drawing materials in trade, or as booty after a military engagement, or from a raid. Initially, the content of ledger drawings continued the tradition of depicting of military exploits and important acts of personal heroism already established in representational painting on buffalo hides and animal skins. As the US government implemented the forced relocation of the Plains peoples to reservations, for all practical purposes completed by the end of the 1870s, Plains artists added scenes of ceremony and daily life from before the reservation to the repertoire of their artwork, reflecting the social and cultural changes brought by life on the reservation within the larger context of forced assimilation.

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#nodapl #ledgerart #shoshone #nativeamericanartist #nativeamericanart #stopviolenceagainstwomen #standingrock#waterprotector #treatydefender #treatyrights

 

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